Poe

Edgar Allan Poe & Helen Whitman — Birthday Twins

One of the Providence Athenaeum’s most notable visitors was Edgar Allan Poe. In 1848 he traveled to the city in order to meet and court the wealthy widow and talented poet, Sarah Helen Whitman, with whom he happened to share a birthday, January 19th. She had once written a poem to Poe, to be shared

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Prov Athenaeum Opens Visitors’ Center

I suspect that the Edgar Allan Poe postcard will be popular; I grabbed two immediately. The new visitors’ center on the main floor of the Providence Athenaeum opened quietly last month in what had previously been the director’s office. In addition to used books, the center sells totes, mugs, a Lego model of the library,

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‘The Women Who Loved Poe’ At Lippitt House Museum

The Lippitt House Museum hosts a week of events around “The Women Who Loved Poe” — a film installation by Sandra Luzzi Sneesby — revealing the interior life of writer Edgar Allan Poe, as told by the women who loved him. As is the case with most people, Edgar Allan Poe’s talent and temperament, vocation

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“I Would Prefer Not To”

Who hasn’t thought that. Not About the Buildings and the Providence Athenaeum present The Scrivener-In, a marathon reading of Melville’s Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street and Poe’s The Raven, with discussion. Hear Poe read where Poe once walked. Poe’s poem The Raven, published in 1845, made him famous and inspired praise, parody,

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‘Sex, Lies, and Edgar Allen Poe’

Tonight’s event, marking the bicentennial of Poe’s birth and his doomed, romantic sojourns in Providence, is nearly sold out. Any remaining tickets must be purchased by calling Sandy Markley at 401.421.6970.  The event will feature dramatic readings from Poe — as well as Providence poet, Sarah Helen Whitman —  an exhibit of rare Poe printed

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Providence Daily Dose